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UN – We’re Underestimating Threat From Jihadi Brides

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Renu Begum, eldest sister of Shamima Begum, holds her sister's photo as she is interviewed by the media at New Scotland Yard in 2015. Shamima went on to become a jihadi bride - three times over and now wants to return to the UK. (Photo: Laura Lean / WPA Pool / Getty Images)
Renu Begum, eldest sister of Shamima, holds her sister’s photo as she is interviewed by the media at New Scotland Yard in 2015. Shamima went on to become a jihadi bride – three times over and now wants to return to the UK. (Photo: Laura Lean / WPA Pool / Getty Images)

The threat from jihadi brides is palpable and possibly underestimated, according to the United Nations counter-terrorism body.

The Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate believes the penal system in Syria and Iraq may not be able to cope and if ISIS women are left in those areas, that:

“could exacerbate future Isis-related threats and, more generally, threaten the long-term recovery and stability of the region.”

A recent poll of Clarion subscribers suggests many in the West do not want to allow these women to return to their home countries, Hoda Muthana being one such example, as she seeks to come back to the U.S. The other woman making the headlines is Shamima Begum, stripped of her citizenship by UK Home Secretary Sajid Javid, who takes a tough stance on terror.

Of the more than 7,000 ISIS women, the UN believes only a small fraction went home, leaving those in the Middle East as a potential new army for ISIS and its ideology. The Counter-Terrorism Directorate argues:

“overburdening local judicial capacities and detention facilities, increasing the risk of human rights violations and sowing the seeds of potential further radicalisation.”

 

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