Senior DHS Advisor Gives Thumbs Up to MB Founder

On March 17, senior Department of Homeland Security advisor Mohamed Elibiary copied a tweet ennobling Muslim Brotherhood founder Hassan al-Banna, complete with a picture of the famous Islamist.  He also stated that he met with relatives of Hamas leaders and would soon reach out to American conservatives for collaboration.

The Clarion Project has previously documented Elibiary’s advocacy for the Brotherhood and direct ties to its American branch. The vast majority of Elibiary’s tweets are in defense of the Muslim Brotherhood. Nothing else even comes close. He also regularly defends the overall Islamist cause and derides its critics as “Islamophobes” with bigoted intentions.

In a March 3 tweet, he argued that Hamas does not believe Israel is a genuine peace partner and referenced a meeting he had with relatives of Hamas leaders.

He continues to compare the Muslim Brotherhood to Christian evangelicals and the Protestant Reformation. He states that the Brotherhood is just a “political faction” and “talk of them being a security prob was always just politics.”

He also criticized the Egyptian government to attacking Brotherhood spiritual leader Yousef al-Qaradawi as a fugitive. Elibiary often sends out Muslim Brotherhood statements accusing the Egyptian government of human rights abuses.

In another tweet, Elibiary claims his critics are motivated by “their hatred of Islam and change.”

Elibiary is a long-time Texas Republican Party official who was a delegate for Senator John McCain in 2008. In another recent tweet, he apologizes to his right-wing “fans” for focusing too much on Egypt and says he will soon reach out to them so “we can work together on reviving America.”

In October 2013, a 37-page report on Elibiary was released that was based on my extensive interview with him. Clarion summarized it into 15 disturbing facts about his beliefs, actions and associations.

One fact is that he is a long-time friend of Shukri Abu Baker, the CEO of the Holy Land Foundation, who is in jail for financing Hamas. Baker is also a senior U.S. Muslim Brotherhood operative.

Elibiary opposed the prosecution of the Foundation, which is the largest terrorism-financing trial in U.S. history. Baker was recorded in a secret 1993 meeting urging Brotherhood members to use deception to influence policy in a pro-Islamist direction.

In the interview, he said he helped “safeguard” Muslim non-profits from prosecution after the Holy Land Foundation was shut down. It’s been reported that the Justice Department canned several planned prosecutions of U.S. Muslim Brotherhood figures.

Elibiary then said that the Brotherhood “inside US [is] not [a] security issue today” and praised the ousted President of Egypt Mohammed Morsi as “Egypt’s Mandela.”

He also declared that America “is an Islamic country.”

In December 2013, Clarion reported that Elibiary was a board member of the Dallas-Fort Worth chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in 2003. The Justice Department labeled CAIR an unindicted co-conspirator in the Holy Land Foundation trial and listed it as a U.S. Muslim Brotherhood entity.

CAIR’s operation in Texas was founded by Ghassan Elashi, a founder and chairman of the Holy Land Foundation. He is in prison after being convicted in the trial.

Elibiary was also almost certainly involved in crafting law enforcement guidelines that would leave counter-terrorism personnel blind to the fact that the U.S. Muslim Brotherhood even exists, let alone its non-violent tactics and the nature of the Islamist ideology. The guidelines also are designed to sideline Muslim moderates that oppose the Islamist agenda; a goal he expressed in our interview.

None of these revelations have shaken Elibiary. He is committed to the Muslim Brotherhood cause and he’d rather deal with negative attention than abandon it.

 

Ryan Mauro is the ClarionProject.org’s National Security Analyst, a fellow with the Clarion Project and is frequently interviewed on top-tier TV stations as an expert on counterterrorism and Islamic extremism.