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Islamists Claim to Be Glad the Monster Baghdadi Is Dead. Really?

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ISIS chief Abu-Bakr-al-Baghdadi (Photo: Thierry Ehrmann / Flickr - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)
ISIS chief monster Abu-Bakr-al-Baghdadi (Photo: Thierry Ehrmann/ Flickr/CC 2.0)

After the raid that killed the monster Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the chorus of those who condemned the terror leader included Islamist apologist and Al Jazeera commentator Mehdi Hasan, who tweeted,

It’s very easy to oppose ISIS and everyone does it gladly, including the extremists. But what about his message and the ideology? How many Muslims are opposed to that?

When you look at the statistics in Clarion Project’s short documentary “By the Numbers” (see below), it is clear that the mind set of Muslims all over the world is troubling.

How many Muslims are debating and discussing the following as urgent concerns:

  • Armed jihad
  • Equal status of women
  • Hatred of the “other” (Christians and Jews)
  • Persecution of Muslim sects like the Ahmadiyyas, Shiites and others
  • Oppression of non-Muslims in Muslim lands like Sudan, Pakistan, Nigeria etc.
  • Female genital mutilation, honor killings, and forced and underage marriages
  • The plight of the Yazidi women
  • Institutionalized anti-Semitism, which is on the rise

I could go on and on.

Or as Sebastian Gorka pointed out on Twitter:

So, come on …. if Muslims are happy that Baghdadi is dead but continue to latch onto his ideology, then he’s not dead. He will simply re-surface in some other form.

So, my humble suggestion is: Be glad the monster is dead, but be sure to bury his ideology with him.

 

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Raheel Raza

Raheel Raza is ​an adviser to Clarion Project. ​She is an award-winning author, journalist and filmmaker on the topics of jihad and sharia. She is president of The Council for Muslims Facing Tomorrow, and an activist for human rights, gender equality, and diversity.

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