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British Radical Islamic Group Banned

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The controversial UK-based Radical Islamic group, Muslims Against Crusades, has been banned by British Home Secretary, Theresa May making membership or support of the group a criminal offence. 
Muslims Against Crusades (MAC) is responsible for a number of incidents in London including protests outside the Royal Albert Hall and in Kensington on 11 November 2010, when two large plastic poppies were burned during the Remembrance Day silence.
On 30 July, around 50 members of MAC and Waltham Forest Muslims marched for two hours across central London calling for democracy to be replaced by Shariah law and chanted slogans such as “democracy—hypocrisy”, “Sharia for UK” and “Secularism go to hell”. In August, members of Muslims Against Crusades held a demonstration denouncing the Shi”a denomination and “anti-Islamic” Shi”a regimes of Syria and Iran. To mark the tenth anniversary of the September 11th attacks, around 100 men linked to the group protested outside the U.S. embassy in London, burning U.S. flags and chanting through megaphones. The protest could be heard by mourners in the September 11th Memorial Garden nearby, where a minute”s silence was being observed to mark the first plane hitting the World Trade Centre in New York City.
Just hours after MAC were banned, the home of Anjem Choudary – a high profile Muslim cleric who has strong connections to the extremist organization – was raided by police. Police also raided a nearby community centre where the radical group held meetings and one other address close to his London home.
“It”s a fishing expedition at the end of the day, they”ve got nothing on me” said Choudary. “I haven”t done anything illegal.
“Obviously it”s inconvenient, but that doesn”t stop me propagating what I believe.”
Choudary, who is fast-becoming the public face of Radical Islam in Britain, has pledged to start a new organization to replace the now banned Muslims Against Crusades. 

The controversial UK-based Radical Islamic group, Muslims Against Crusades, has been banned by British Home Secretary, Theresa May making membership or support of the group a criminal offence. 

Muslims Against Crusades (MAC) is responsible for a number of incidents in London including protests outside the Royal Albert Hall and in Kensington on 11 November 2010, when two large plastic poppies were burned during the Remembrance Day silence.

On 30 July, around 50 members of MAC and Waltham Forest Muslims marched for two hours across central London calling for democracy to be replaced by Shariah law and chanted slogans such as “democracy—hypocrisy”, “Shariah for UK” and “Secularism go to hell”.

In August, members of Muslims Against Crusades held a demonstration denouncing the Shi”a denomination and “anti-Islamic” Shi”a regimes of Syria and Iran. To mark the tenth anniversary of the September 11th attacks, around 100 men linked to the group protested outside the U.S. embassy in London, burning U.S. flags and chanting through megaphones. The protest could be heard by mourners in the September 11th Memorial Garden nearby, where a minute”s silence was being observed to mark the first plane hitting the World Trade Centre in New York City.

Just hours after MAC were banned, the home of Anjem Choudary – a high profile Muslim cleric who has strong connections to the extremist organization – was raided by police. Police also raided a nearby community centre where the radical group held meetings and one other address close to his London home.

“It”s a fishing expedition at the end of the day, they”ve got nothing on me” said Choudary. “I haven”t done anything illegal.

“Obviously it”s inconvenient, but that doesn”t stop me propagating what I believe.”

Choudary, who is fast-becoming the public face of Radical Islam in Britain, has pledged to start a new organization to replace the now banned Muslims Against Crusades. 

 

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Meira Svirsky

Meira Svirsky is the editor of ClarionProject.org

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