Angry Egyptian Mourners Chase Morsi from Soldiers’ Funeral

The prime Minister of Egypt’s newly elected Islamist government was chased away from the military funeral of the 16 soldiers who were killed by jihadist in the Sinai Peninsula by angry mourners. Egypt’s state-run news site, Ahram Online, reported that amid shouts of, "You killed them, you dog," and a barrage of shoes being thrown, Prime Minister Hesham Kandil was rushed out of the scene by his bodyguards.

The people’s anger comes from the hotly contested presidential race, which recently put the Muslim Brotherhood- affiliated Mohammed Morsi into power. The race between Morsi and his secular (military-affiliated) opponent was neck and neck. Egypt’s military is a supporter of the overthrown Mubarek regime and considered the only force left in Egypt that can stand up to the Islamists.

During the elections, Islamists publicized the “Islamic” duty to win the race at any cost. Opponents of the Islamists reported corruption at the polls as well as the blockage of streets leading to them for the nations Coptic Christian (supporters of the secular candidate).

The mourners hold the Islamist government responsible for the attack because of their support for HAMAS. Initial news reports said that the jihadists originated in HAMAS-controlled Gaza before crossing into Egypt to commandeer the armored personnel carriers that were to be used to carry out their planned attack on Israel.

The mourners were also venting their anger over the new government’s opening of the Egyptian-Gaza border crossing. Gaza is ruled by HAMAS. Egypt closed the crossing after the attack.

Morsi opponent, Ahmed Shafiq is a former air force commander,  and has called for a new revolution to oust the Islamists from power.

Ahram Online reported that Aya Hussein, a university student who attended the funeral, said, "We went to mourn the dead, but the people who ended up chasing Kandil away were also handing out anti-Morsi pamphlets calling for a revolution against the Muslim Brotherhood on Aug. 24."

A popular secular Egyptian talk show host who opposed the revolution, Tawfik Okasha, also called for ousting the Islamists through protest.