×

13-Yr Old Commands Int’l Neo-Nazi Group

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Neo-Nazis in Germany march in support of Holocuast denier Ursula Haverbeck, who is serving a two-year sentence for her outspoken denials regarding the Holocaust, which in Germany is a criminal offense. The march took place in 2019 on the anniversary of Kristallnacht, the 1938 Nazi-led pogrom against synagogues and Jewish-owned businesses across Germany. (Photo: Thomas F. Starke/Getty Images)
Neo-Nazis in Germany march in support of Holocaust denier Ursula Haverbeck, who is serving a two-year sentence for her outspoken denials of the Holocaust, which in Germany is a criminal offense. The march took place in 2019 on the anniversary of Kristallnacht, the 1938 Nazi-led pogrom against synagogues and Jewish-owned businesses across Germany. (Photo: Thomas F. Starke/Getty Images)

The leader of an international neo-Nazi group – a group whose members plotted to attack a synagogue in Las Vegas and car bomb a CNN office – was just 13 years old when he was discovered by police earlier this year, reported the AP.

The “Commander,” as he called himself, was one of the leaders of the Feuerkrieg Division, an extremist organization that advocates for the “acceleration” of societal collapse by provoking a violent and massive race war between Far Left and Far Right groups.

In January, police intervened and confronted the boy “because of a suspicion of danger.” Since then, the boy’s activities with the Feuerkrieg Division have been suspended.

“As the case dealt with a child under the age of 14, this person cannot be prosecuted under the criminal law and instead other legal methods must be used to eliminate the risk. Cooperation between several authorities, and especially parents, is important to steer a child away from violent extremism,” said Harrys Puusepp, a spokesman for the Estonian Internal Security Service.

The boy was also identified through the gaming platform Steam, where his account lists his URL as “HeilHitler8814.”

He apparently operated from his home computer in Saaremaa, an island of Estonia. It is unclear if other members of the online group knew of the boy’s age.

In 2018, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) identified the group as one of the most extreme of the white supremacist organizations. Although their numbers at the time were estimated at about 30, members of the group were investigated by the FBI, who gained access to the group’s encrypted chats on the Wire online platform.

“That young kids are getting that sense of belonging from a hate movement is more common than most people realize and very disturbing. But accessing a world of hate online today is as easy as it was tuning into Saturday morning cartoons on television,” said the vice president of ADL’s Center on Extremism Oren Segal.

In April, as Clarion reported, one member of the group, Conor Climo, 24, told an FBI source about his plans to firebomb a synagogue, an LGBTQ bar or attack a local ADL office. Climo was subsequently arrested and pleaded guilty to a felony possession of an unregistered firearm.

Clarion also reported that the same week, another man , who is now said to be linked to the Feuerkrieg Division, was also arrested. Former Army soldier Jarrett William Smith, 24, pleaded guilty to two counts of distribution of bomb-making instructions. Smith was stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas when he provided information about explosives to an undercover FBI agent.

Smith had spoken with online contacts identifying possible targets, which included CNN’s headquarters and former senate/presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke.

“Right-wing extremists, Islamist extremists and Left-wing extremists all believe that they face genocide and therefore want to extinguish each other, and they all end up fueling each other,” says Ryan Mauro, Shillman Fellow and head of the Clarion Intelligence Network in his seminal video “War of the Extremes.”

Find out what you can do to prevent our children from becoming violent extremists by clicking here

Kids: Chasing Paradise is Clarion’s latest and soon-to-be-released powerful film that takes an unflinching look at the brutal exploitation of youth by Islamist extremists worldwide. The documentary features compelling personal stories of children, who are actively influenced by extremists, and their families, and showcases activists and experts who confront this growing global threat.

Check out the trailer for our upcoming film “Kids: Chasing Paradise” about the radicalization of children by clicking here

 

RELATED STORIES

Left Vs. Right: Fueling Us to the Brink of Destruction 

The War to End All Wars? 

Uptick in Arrests of Neo-Nazis Plotting Violent Attacks

Subscribe to our newsletter

By entering your email, you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Be ahead of the curve and get Clarion Project's news and opinion straight to your inbox